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john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secretary of the naacp, roy wilkins, appeared right here on "meet the press." many of you either already had the chance or will have the opportunity to see that special program as we have made it the original bro
jersey, cory booker, and republican governor of louisiana bobby jindal. what the american dream means to a new generation of politicians. >>> and later, we'll have the latest on the developing situation in syria. new developments this morning. we've got it covered. >>> the truth of the matter is that the dream still demands that the moral conscience of our country still calls us, that hope still needs heroes. we need to understand that there is still work to do. >> that was newark mayor and u.s. senate candidate cory booker speaking yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. he joins me now. mr. mayor, welcome. >> thank you very much. good to be back. >> good to have you back. we're talking about the legacy of the i have a dream speech and dr. king's dream. here you are, trying to become the first african-american senator from new jersey. there's one other african-american senator in the united states senate, one african-american governor, deval patrick in massachusetts, african-american president, and attorney general. so much progress but still uneven when it comes to elected offic
department speaking on the louisiana school voucher program allowing students to transfer out of publi failing pc schools and into private ones. the justice department says it will impact the racial balance in some district still under desegregation orders. louisiana governor bobby jindal said it's the doj that's discriminating. governor, very good to have you. >> neil, thank for having me today. >> talk about weird timing, right? this dust up right on martin luther king day. what do you think? >> you know, it's amazing to me. the department of justice, the obama administration are using the same rules designed to protect minority children to actually keep them trapped in failing public schools. we've got 8,000 kids in the scholarship program. 100% are low income. 100% came out of c, d, or f public schools. 93% of their parents are happier in the schools that they're in. 100% of their parents chose to put them in other schools. we're saving taxpayers money, delivering a better education, and the governor is right. the speech was amazing 50 years ago, that we should be judged by the co
it simple.ple. >> thank you, gary. >>> here is the story we are promising. >> amazing video out of louisiana. >> check this out. >> a group of trees swallowed uu by a sinkhole in a assumption parish. >> unbelievable. >> >> watch this. >> incredible. >> the trees vanish into the water. >> this is happening on and off about a year now ever since sale dome collapsed.do >> trees don't usually go down like this. >> still ahead on the 6. the >> annual tradition marking the return of football season. >>> 'skins welcome luncheon and dressed to the nine's lindsey with sports edge. >>> good evening. >> i'm lipsy murphy. nfc east champions were honored in welcome home luncheon.eon. 52 years the team celebrated the end of one season and beginning of another as the team anxiously awaits the september kick off against the eagles. eag >> auctioneers did a good job. i would have given them 10 granh but the nfl took it from me this week. >> a comedian as always robert griffin iii making light of his $10,000 fine for apparel violation. recipient of offensive player on the yearsi award. kicker had special team
this morning." >>> a deadly end overnight to a standoff in louisiana. police say a mentally unstable man took three people hostage in the small river town of st. joseph. now, a look at the violent end to the siege. [ sirens ] >> reporter: the deadly standoff began around noon tuesday. when authorities say a gunman armed with a rifle and handgun, took three people hostage at this st. joseph's bank in rural northeast louisiana. >> we still been able to talk to him. they've asked for some food and provisions. >> reporter: law enforcement agencies were called in to assist with negotiations that dragged on for nearly 12 hours. but officials pledged to do whatever was necessary. >> the teams we have can be in place for a long period. we're going to be here as long as it takes. >> reporter: a female hostage was released later in the day. but police tell cbs news that around midnight s.w.a.t. teams were forced to kill the gunman after he shot the two remaining victims. apparently because his demands weren't met. >> fuad abdo ahmed was the perpetrator's name. he is deceased at the
. in fact, it is a revelation when a republican congressman like louisiana's david vitter says he will do the job he was elected to do. >> is your office going to help constituents who might simply want to buy insurance? >> well, we are helping folks in any way we can to get them good information. we field calls e everyday in my offices around louisiana to try to help people with individual questions and circumstances, and i would encourage folks to call our office to try to get that guidance and help. >> suicide caucus take note, a republican senator will answer calls from the people who elected them even if the questions are about something that he doesn't like. joining me today is host msnbc's disrupt karen finney and host of "up" with steve kornacki, and joining us from oklahoma city is a rpt congressman from oklahoma's fourth district deputy majority whip tom cole, and thank you for joining us while you are on the recess. and i hope that the august heat is not as hot over there as other parts of the country, although we are hearing according to the associated press that during one of
. this is stanford from louisiana, 77 years old. hello. caller: good morning. i'm calling because i was at the first march. i had followed what was going on during that time. that you are speaking of included -- and i want to speak -- included in that spirit and i want to speak of the veterans of the civil rights march. had ato me that the vets to the united states military. they do notl, support president kennedy early on. the vets had come home seeking to participate in the country's they sought civil rights. some were hung in their uniforms. so threats to their homes and communities, the veterans regressed back to their homes and their neighborhoods and their farms and things like that. until they heard of reverend king and his movement. then they came out. never saw the crowds behind the frontline of king, lori, and that group, the group of the leadership in the march. who were those people behind them? vets.f them were most of the more people who had fought in germany and north africa and the philippines and japan, etc. they came home and they do not have civil rights for themselves. so here's
was the executive director of c.o.r.e. well, farmer was in jail in louisiana and refused to come out of jail to participate in the march. and here is martin luther king, jr., a wonderful human being. wer, my met him in 1958 when i was 18 years old. this is eugene carson blake, who was head of the national council of churches. and this young man here is cleveland robinson. this man was almost blind, but no one wanted to say to him, "but you cannot walk with the group." and so he walked with us. this is rabbi joachim prince of the american jewish congress. he was born in berlin and moved to america during the late '30s. he moved to newark, new jersey, and became a leader, a spokesperson for civil liberty, civil rights. and this is joe rauh. he was one of the unbelievable leaders in the naacp. and this is unbelievable whitney young, who was head of the national urban league. >> right. >> who's been a dean at the school of social work at atlanta university. roy wilkins, the head of the naacp. walter reuther, the head of the united automobile workers union. >> and this is a. philip randolph. >> y
and pastors from louisiana is one of the many making the journey by bus. aljazeera's robert ray joins us for the ride from tallahassee, florida. >> in the middle of the night in new orleans, students, pastors and community organizers prayed. >> let us bow our heads in prayer. >> heading to the capitol for the anniversary of the civil rights march on washington and martin luther king, jr.'s historic i have a dream speech. this group of 60 took to the road, singing, rejoicing and reflecting. "we shall overcome someday ♪ >> a stop at a church in tallahassee, florida, they talked about community organizing, civil rights and how things have changed in america. >> what martin luther king was talking about is not civil rights fours, it's civil rights, period, for humanity. >> raymond henry served in afghanistan and iraq, now he's a senior at southern university in new orleans. he says there's been progress, but he believes that there is a disconnect among races, a barrier that still exists. >> we've got a bus right now loaded full of all african-americans. i think that's the problem. if i got
help. shortly after the rick perry story became public this week, jindal of louisiana decided to pull his own application for this same program. >> thanks to both of you. >>> tonight, the annual mcdonald's 365 black awards will be broadcast on television for the first time in its ten-year history. 11:00 p.m. eastern on b.e.t. one of this year's honorees, supermodel and actress beverly johnson. the first african-american woman to ever grace the cover of "vogue" magazine. with us live now, beverly johnson, along with mcdonald's director of marketing robert jackson. beverly, let me start with you. tonight's awards broadcast just so happens to fall on the 50th anniversary weekend of the march on washington as well. how has the civil rights movement, how has it touched your own american dream? >> well, i would most certainly say that august 1974 "vogue" cover probably wouldn't have happened, where i graced that cover, if it weren't for the civil rights movement. and i just want to thank mcdonald's for this very prestigious award, the black mcdonald operators, and also walton isaacson for t
the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. heading towards louisiana avenue as they make their way towards the lincoln memorial. at least 100,000 people gathering for speeches. we have a little bit of a weather issue. the "today" show's al roker. what have you seen so far? there's a little bit of nervousness about the weather. >> yes, it was raining here earlier. it's been -- it's still sprinkling off and on. we expect it to dry out maybe in the next hour or so. and then there's another area of showers and thunderstorms back through western p.a. and maryland that will probably get in here later this afternoon. probably about the time the president is expecting or thereabouts. it's going to be kind of interesting. right now, sound checks, folks milling about. obviously, as you can imagine, security is very tight here. we went through some of the tightest security i remember coming through events here in washington, even more so than an inaugural. and like i said, people are, though, very -- there's a festive mood here. people are really excited about being here, chuck. >> and i want
back to the louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "we hold these truths to be system of self- -- self evident that all men are created equal." i have a dream that one day on the red hills of georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i
to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friend friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow i still have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream. i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up, live out the true meaning of its creed. we hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal. i have a dream that one day on the red hills of georgia, sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of
, when all of the marches and the leaders get here, one of the big six is in jail in louisiana. couldn't even come because he was in jail from protests. the tension behind the stage here was over your speech. >> by the forces of our demand, our determinations and numbers we should split the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in an image of god and democracy. we must say wake up america because we may not be patient. >> they wanted to change a line in your speech. tell us about that. >> near the end of the speech, near the very end i said something like if we do not see meaningful progress here today, the day may come where we will not confine our march on washington but we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did non-violently. they said you can't say that. and the archbishop of the diocese of washington said not to give that. we met on the side of mr. lincoln. >> is that right? >> and we had a portable typewriter. and the executive secretary, randolph was there. dr. king and wilkin. then dr. king said to me, john, can we change that? he s
that the party needed to get away from what he called navel gazing. that sounded like a jab to louisiana governor bobby kristol to a lot of the people in this room, wolf. but christie went on to say there really isn't anything wrong with the republican party's principles. he said it's the strategy, their approach to winning, something he says he's got going in new jersey now. >> is bobby jindal, the louisiana governor, is he at these meetings as well? >> reporter: he is not here. and neither is rand paul. christie was able to work on those jabs. no response from the senator on the governor, wolf. >> bob acosta, thank you. >> when we come back, the former republican congressman and former presidential republican candidate standing by to respond to governor krchristie. and i'll ask him whether his son has what it takes to win the nomination in 2016. he's got a new tv channel as well. we'll discuss when we come back. ♪ [ male announcer ] a man. a man and his truck... and a broken fence... and a lost calf. ♪ and the heart to search for as long as it takes. and the truck that lets him search for a
-old in louisiana shot and killed his 90-year-old caregiver as she watched television. police report the boy had just finished playing the video game grand theft auto. are violent media affecting kids and making them violent. joining us, the doctor from our fine medical aid team. thanks for joining us this morning. that is the question, the piece in the "new york times" this week that said most researchers agree violent media do have an effect on media, do increase the predilection to violence. >> i think focusing on violent media misses the greater problem, which is media. we are deploying, whether through facebook or reality tv lots of ways for people to not be in reality, to not feel their feelings. yes, violent video games are part of that problem, because you can't maintain the connection and have a real reality while being wrenched into virtual reality. it does not work. human beings do not have that capacity, at least some of the outliers among us do not. >> so you're saying that as we're basically anesthetizing our kids with television or video games that aren't able to process how they
't they? lara? >>> we turn now to the alarming hostage situation overnight in a bank in louisiana. a 20-year-old man taking three people hostage tuesday afternoon, in a tense standoff with police that lasted well into the night. abc's pierre thomas is back with us now with the latest. good morning, pierre. >> reporter: good morning, lara. police were hoping to resolve this standoff peacefully. but it ended in a bloody spray of gunfire. shortly before midnight, police stormed the bank, after they say the gunman indicated he was going to kill two hostages. according to police, as they entered the building, the suspect, identified as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed, shot the hostages, both bank employees. police killed the suspect, who they claim was armed with a handgun and a rifle. the confrontation began more than 12 hours earlier, when the gunman walked into the bank and began making bizarre demands. police say the suspect was a paranoid schizophrenic who claimed he had been hearing voices, including from a device planted in his head. authorities believe it was not a bank robbery but a pl
as many as six or seven refineries from kansas, oklahoma, texas, to louisiana. doubt that the vast majority if not 100% of the gasoline will be distributed within the united states and not put on. do export diesel because we don't use the soul like europe does. so, we have had a symbiotic relationship. we send them our diesel and they send us their gasoline. and also some of the lubricant and manufacturing products that thatight products from oil we don't use will be exported, too. those are actually healthy for our economy. host: representative terry, an issue that does affect nebraska but you do not necessarily think about nebraska when you talk about immigration. how does it affect nebraska? personally on the issue of immigration and how would you like to see it? guest: it does affect nebraska. plants inlot of we rely on that hispanic labor. we have had a good share of immigrants into both omaha, my district, as well as other cities throughout nebraska. where i am is, we need reform. we absolutely need to attack this issue. this is -- and i think pretty much the consensus of the
waved at police officers when he passed them on his bike in evansville, louisiana. they thought he recognized him. they didn't rec him and deemed his wave a threat. they almost used a stun gun and put him in cuffs while they could verify his identity. detained for saying held okay. wow, that's one we couldn't wave off, seriously. madison filed a complaint with the police department's internal affairs division. >>> coming up, the right wing and race, time to send in the clowns. giving people choices. especially today, as people are looking for more low, and no calorie options. that's why on vending machines, we're making it easy for people to know how many calories are in their favorite beverages, before they choose. and we're offering more low calorie options, including over 70 in our innovative coca-cola free-style dispensers. working with our beverage industry and restaurant partners, we're helping provide choices that make sense for everyone. because when people come together, good things happen. glass on floors. daily chores. for the little mishaps you feel use neosporin to hel
've been in louisiana, we've been all over the place as have other organizations. what you're about to see as we get to the new year and 2014, you're going to see unleashed a wave of litigation that's going to be very difficult for additional to defend. this is not what congress wanted of that's why we had section 5. >> expensive. >> the fight was brought to us and we're going to take it on. what we're going to see is really an effort to bring to light, to bring into the courtrooms and consciousness of americans this challenge to democracy. you just heard in your previous sequence that's what really this is all about. this is a real challenge to democracy. we're standing at a crossroads and have to meet the challenge. >> it feels to me like this idea that congress didn't want this is also where democracy could flex its muscle. do you have any sense, any optimism we can get a new section 4 formula that will put the teeth back in section 5 from the congress. >> i'm very optimistic but also a practicigmatist as well. people are going to have onpush for this. dr. king did what was called a peo
jersey, cory booker, and governor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rights, the struggle of the middle class, is a
. joining us is a board certified emergency room physician and an adjunct assistant professor at louisiana state university shreveport. great to see you. >> great to be here. jamie: we worry about the kids being sick and not being able to start school but we worry about us, too. what do we need to do to keep both of us healthy? >> you know, the summer colds -- colds are caused all year long. you're right. the summer colds are lasting longer. so people are confusing them with allergies. so the most important thing you can do is wash your hands. don't let your kids touch their face or eat anything before they wash their hands because unfortunately, the common cold we still don't have a cure for it. there's no vaccine. you don't need antiobiotics for it so just got -- >> are we using anti-bacterial too much? >> it didn't really help that much with the flu if you could wash your hands but if you can't wash your hands, it's a good alternative and sending your kids that are old enough to know not to put it in their mouth and things like that to school might be a good option, too. jamie: and how
't ride on the front of a bus until he was 26 or 27 years old. i'm from the deep south, louisiana. everything was segregated, and i have lived an integrated life. i think socially the nation has changed a lot, but a lot of my friends are people who really were at the near bottom of society, in jail, the war on drugs and all these different things that are donth,,,, female announcer: female announcer: when you see this truck, it means another neighbor is going to sleep better tonight because they went to sleep train's ticket to tempur-pedic event. choose from a huge selection of tempur-pedic models, including the new tempur-choice with head-to-toe customization. plus, get 36 months interest-free financing, two free pillows, and free same-day delivery. are you next? announcer: but don't wait. sleep train's ticket to tempur-pedic is ending soon. ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ it's no longer days, >>> good morning, everyone. it's 8:55. i'm michelle griego with your kpix 5 headlines. it's no longer days but hours until the bay bridge closes. after 8:00 tonight, no one wi
" columnist and distinguished fellow. robert mann, professor at louisiana state university and author of "the walls of jericho," walter fields, now executive editor of northstarnews.com, black public affairs news and website. jack rosin that wi rosenthal, j department aide to robert f. kennedy. thank you for joining us. bob, i was struck by "meet the press" 50 years ago this sunday. the automatic sumgts if black people are coming to washington, d.c., they're militant. >> militant negros, look out. to me part of the problem with over what has happened in the past half century, despite all the progress that has been made, i think not nearly enough, i think that there are not enough militant negros out there marching or do whatever else -- doing whatever else is necessary to bring economic justice, which was the underlying theme -- actually not so underlying theme of the original march on washington. i think that's one of the reasons blacks are having such a hard time right now. >> jack, i wondered, you were there in the justice department, being part of the preparations for really -- just take
in louisiana at the time. to beduke -- happened teaching in louisiana at the time. david duke nearly became governor of our state. i decided i needed to get politically active to keep the kkk from taking over the state i live in. i became active with the national organization for women because of n.o.w.'s commitment to the intersection of racism, able-ism, homophobia, all of the ism's. they are intertwined. we have been talking to colleagues in the weeks and days leading up to this very luncheon. one of the things we talked of thes the four themes 50th anniversary march on washington. that would be freedom and jobs and peace and social justice. when you look at those issues and ask yourself, what is the impact on women of those things -- then you ask yourself, what is the impact on various communities of women? what is the impact on african- american women? what is the impact on immigrant women? what about latinas, and younger women, and older women? long time ago, a legal scholar she hadrothy roberts -- that phrase. ask the woman question. any issue you are talking about, ask the woman que
for the schools. i have a comment. --re is a hole in louisiana louisiana, 29% of the republicans blamed obama for the government's katrina mess. i think these people that did that are absolutely ignorant. he was just a senator, not the president. host: thank you for calling. republican line, welcome to the program. if the cost of college worth it? well, it was like $15,000 a year 20 years ago for my daughter. local --ually got to a she is a nurse. my husband was discussed to -- he fell she concentrated more on the marching band than the college. she would to community college after that. i am quite disturbed. i put myself through a business school, whatever, 40 years ago. i paid for it out of my $100 weeks salary. the cost can't afford of tuition should consider vocational school, business schools. why should the taxpayers be paying -- >> there are a lot of kids -- you go back to the academic standards. most of the kids going to they are not academically qualified to go. they're getting a free pass because of the social justice that. i don't mind if a kid is qualified or what ethnicity, natio
crime. this happened in slaughter louisiana, louisiana. is that the name authorities say the boy was playing grand theft auto 4 just minutes before that shooting. the game awards points to the players for killing people. the woman died after at least one gunshot wound to the head. department of defense training material call conservatives and founding fathers extremists. this guide obtained by judicial watch advises students rather than dressing up in sheets, modern day radicals will talk about states' rights and how to make the world a better place it was authored by the defense equal opportunity management institute. a dog funded diversity training center. besides a brief reference to 9/11 and another to the sudanese civil war the guide makes no mention of islamic extremism but it does say. this quote: in u.s. history there are many examples of extremist ideology. and movements. the colonists who sought to free themselves from british rule and the confederate states who sought to succeed from the northern states are just two examples. do you think those are -- scribbled note t
from the streets of soma, the fields of georgia, louisiana. is now a united states senator representing the state of maine. he was in the march. seat to good siege -- watch the speech of dr. king. he was in a branch of a tree in the mall watching the speech. people came from all over. these crowd people and these proud african americans and their allies would no longer stand silent why the promise -- while the promise of liberty and justice for all denied freedom to so many. i could not hear the speeches. i felt the heat. i was inside the capital. but i could see the tide of hundreds of as thousands of our brothers and --ters pushed forward tour toward that thing called freedom. day, martin luther king shared his dream. 1963 not as the end of the fight of civil rights, but only the beginning. here is what he said. "we cannot turn back. there are those who are acting -- asking for the civil rights, when will we be satisfied? we are not satisfied and we will not be until justice rolls down like a mighty stream." in the year following the march, those momentum -- momentous words, congress
sinkhole in the louisiana just swallowing up the trees and the land in a matter of seconds. look. >> oh, that is a big hole. just gone. authorities say it is 25-acres across. likely hundreds of feet deep in some spots. and it is just been getting bigger and bigger. joining us now is the man who shot the incredible video. john beaudreau, assumption parish-offs of homeland security and director of emergency preparedness there. first of all this is apparently being blamed on salt mining. explain what caused it. >> it is a right adjacent to a salt dome where there's solution mining activities goes on the salt dome and this is caused due to a failed cavern to the salt outer wall. which is disturbed the, it is as much as 5,000 feet deep and has created the sinkhole. gregg: yeah. how did you know you weren't going to get swallowed up in this thing? it is so huge? >> well, this is, happened before. i observed this before and, was familiar with what was going to happen. so, this is just a, the first time we actually captured it on video but i have seen this before. so, i was quite confident on w
to that ex tents. when louisiana plays the big game, we're choosing my complexion. the second part of the dream was of a bill to make that kind of behavior legal, the civil rights act. then the dream was the right to vote. 18-year-olds would not vote. you couldn't vote on campus. you couldn't vote bilingually. we went to open housing and fair housing. that was another part. last dream really was about the issue of poverty. too much poverty at home and too much war abroad. that remains unfinished business today in a nation so blessed with so few and such abundance, too much poverty. >> he would at this point in time be 84 years of age and if he looked out across the landscape of america and saw 46-plus million people were still languishing in poverty, how would he address that? >> he would challenge the white house and the congress to make it a priority. we have the capacity to wipe out malnutrition. we can make the -- most poor people -- lyndon johnson was ingenious was helping people in appalachia. if you made that into a black community, no, they don't want to work or something,
the streets of california and the las vegas trip, from the streets of soma, the fields of georgia, louisiana. one man is now a united states senator representing the state of maine. he was in the march. he had a good seat to watch the speech of dr. king. he was in a branch of a tree in the mall watching the speech. people came from all over. these crowd people and these proud african americans and their allies would no longer stand silent while the promise of liberty and justice for all denied freedom to so many. i could not hear the speeches. i felt the heat. i was inside the capital. but i could see the tide of history turn as hundreds of thousands of our brothers and sisters pushed forward toward that thing called freedom. that day, martin luther king shared his dream. they consider 1963 not as the end of the fight of civil rights, but only the beginning. here is what he said. "we cannot turn back. there are those who are acting asking for the civil rights, when will we be satisfied? we are not satisfied and we will not be until justice rolls down like a mighty stream." in the year follow
don't know if you guys are fans of "true blood" on hbo. really hot people in louisiana that turn out to be vampires and werewolves. joe manganiello plays the hot werewolf. >> it's a long, strange story. i'll tell you on the way. >> clearly, that guy is very talented there. a very talented trained actor. he has a bfa from carnegie melon. get it out because i have good jokes coming up. joe manganiello classically tra trained and he says while he likes "true blood" he wants more. he says this, he says, running shirtless in the woods pays the bills, but it's only a sliver of what i do. he continues, "sometimes all i'm being asked to do is rip my shirt off and growl." so, joe manganiello you win the "man, do i know how you feel award." nuothing worse than being asked to rip your shirt off and growl. actually, just once i want to be asked to rip my shirt off and growl. >> i want you to know, i'm not laughing. the other two are. >> you're laughing at what. the concept to you is laughable? >> no, laughing with you and you'll get your chance, my friend. when fabio makes his way to "new day" t
from louisiana to our school in washington because we do not have any. i want to say i have a personal story here. she turned 56 today. on that day in 1963, we all sat down on the floor in our living room and watched a black and white tv. for a child that had turned six have ad that day -- birthday party, she wanted to speech,. king gave his even to the point that my father said, you've got to move your head, because her head was in the way. she was so enthralled. at one time i was suspended from king'sbefore dr. birthday became a holiday. people thealled night before. because theschool schools in seattle were leaving at 12:00. the told me into the office. there was a big ruckus. me fors they suspended gathering people together during school in honor of dr. king. so yes, it has changed. i also want to say that i am appalled at the way the statesnt of these united is treated. to be called a liar in the halls of congress is an abomination. host: thank you for the call from washington. we have this point on our twitter page. king came to washington as part of a demonstration on racial and
went to play a football game in new orleans, louisiana. closer to the mic? i like talking loud. i got my dad's genes for talking loud. can you all hear me? and in 1965 when they went down to new orleans, there was a running back for the buffalo bills named cookie gilchrist. cookie used to drive around the milk truck in the off-season when they had to make money, because football salaries didn't pay enough and his milk truck -- his truck was selling candies and ice cream, who knows what else, but his truck would say looky, looky, here comes cookie. [laughter] and but cookie is in new orleans, he's trying to get a cab. and he hails a cab, a cab stops and the cab driver rolls up the window and says sorry, sir, probably didn't say sir. just wanted to get to the bar down the street. what ended up happening african-american players couldn't stay in the same hotel as their white teammates and they decided to stand up and say this is not right. move the game. his father was president of the naacp at the time. tried to work out a solution. all of the white players agreed with the black players
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